Articles Posted in Identity Theft

by

BusinessWeek.com has posted an article about a recent identity theft case. Leonardo Darnell Zanders was convicted for helping to lead a ring of identity theft that caused $1.5 million in losses to financial institutions, including Ben S. Bernanke, a Federal Reserve Board Chairman, and his wife among the victims. Zanders must also repay $1.4 million in reimbursements.

Zanders pled guilty for…

conspiring to commit bank fraud. He helped direct the scheme to use the IDs and stolen bank information to impersonate victims and make “split” transactions, depositing a check drawn on the bank account of another victim, and then siphoning the money out of the falsely inflated account, court records show.

by
Posted in:
Updated:

by

Our friend Denise Richards, of givemebackmycredit.com, has posted an article about Sidejacking. Sidejacking is a threat that is not really new, but many people still don’t know about the risk that can lead to identity theft.

Sidejacking occurs when a person hacks into a wireless internet connection and steals your personal information. Websites like Facebook, Myspace and various emails through search engines are at risk of being hacked if you login on wireless connections at public locations such as airports, coffeeshops, hotels, etc.

The sidejacker does not gain access to your specific username and password, but he does obtain the unencrypted session ID that is transmitted over the wireless connection from the website back to you. If the hacker gains access to the session ID, then he can enter the session and gain access to most of the information in your account.

by
Posted in:
Updated:

by

The Associated Press has posted an article about a man from Miami, Albert Gonzalez, who has reportedly tried to steal 130 million credit card numbers. “The one-time government informant” is being charged with the largest case of credit and debit card data theft in the nation’s history…on top of another 40 million numbers that he previously stole.

Gonzalez used to work for the US Secret Service as an informant responsible for tracking hackers, which is ironic because

…the agency later found out that he had also been working with criminals and feeding them information on ongoing investigations, even warning off at least one individual, according to authorities.

Two Russian co-conspirators also joined Gonzalez in attempting to hack into corporate computer networks to leave malware that would give them access to steal data. They targeting major companies such as 7-Eleven Inc, the grocery store chain Hannaford Brothers, Co. Inc, as well as a New Jersey based card-payment processor named Heartland Payment Systems.

by

Our friend Denise Richardson has posted an article about the growing concern of medical identity theft. In 2007 more than 250,000 people reported being victims of medical identity theft, which is even harder to correct than kinds of financial identity theft.

Richardson links to a New York Times Article that discusses how medical identity theft happens.

…someone can use stolen insurance information, like the basic member ID and group policy number found on insurance cards, to impersonate you – and receive everything from a routine physical to major surgery under your coverage. This is surprisingly easy to do, because many doctors and hospitals do not ask for identification beyond insurance information.

by
Posted in:
Updated:

by

Denise Richardson of GiveMeBackMyCredit.com has posted an article about the problem of children being the victims of identity theft. Often, the theft isn’t discovered until years later when…

a young adult is denied a student loan, credit or employment, all because of a destroyed credit rating.

Stolen Social Security Numbers and birth certificates are available to be purchased with relative ease, and thieves are able to manipulate children’s identities to their advantage. The Social Security Administration doesn’t have a “check and balance” system yet that can put names, ages, and genders with Social Security Numbers.

If you, or your child, have been victims of identity theft, feel free to contact us.

by
Posted in:
Updated:

by

Denise Richardson of Give Me Back My Credit.com has posted an article in which she discusses “caller ID spoofing.” Caller ID Spoofing is when the number displayed on your caller ID isn’t the number actually calling.

Scammers can use this method of spoofing to pose as hospitals or banks (or any other place), and then trick you into telling them personal information. This can be as simple as a prank, or lead to identity theft .

Still, precautions should be taken. Richardson advises never giving personal information out to anyone who calls your landline phone. She suggests looking up the company that called you and see if it’s a legitimate number and then call them back.

by
Posted in:
Updated:

by

Denise Richardson has reported on the data breach at the University of Alabama:

University of Alabama campus officials sent letters out to 37,000 people whose personal information may have been stolen by computer hackers.

The school revealed Friday that in November, seventeen of their four-hundred databases were tapped by hackers. One of those computers contained lab results for people tested at the campus Medical Center. However, school officials say campus computer technicians quickly caught the hackers before they likely retrieved any confidential information.

by

Our friend Denise Richardson who runs the site Give Me Back My Credit was down for a bit due to attacks but is now back up and running better than before. This site is a wonderful resource for identity theft issues, collection agency abuse, and credit reporting errors. Please make sure you subscribe to her site or visit there often.

Keep up the good work Denise!

Another resource for you is to join our Facebook Fan Page – Alabama Consumer Protection Attorneys where we share useful information about the same types of issues that we cover in this blog.

by

One of our favorite blogs (and bloggers) is Denise Richardson who has a wealth of helpful information about identity theft and other consumer issues. Her personal story is impressive and the content of her site reveals her dedication to consumers. She has recently redesigned her website and blog – check them out and if you don’t subsribe by RSS to her blog we recommend you do so in order to make sure you get to read all of her posts.

Keep up the great work Denise!

Another resource for you is to join our Facebook Fan Page – Alabama Consumer Protection Attorneys where we share useful information about the same types of issues that we cover in this blog.

by

In these turbulent economic times, it is more important than ever to keep your credit reports clean and free of errors. Having an error could lead to your credit card limits being reduced. Your credit card rates being increased. Losing a security clearance which could lead to losing your job. Our friend Denise Richards has an excellent post on this subject. Read the entire article (as it also has links that will be helpful) but here are the ten steps she suggests:

Here are the 10 quick tips that can help you avoid fraud -(or errors) that can be costly;

1. Monitor bank, credit card and loan statements. If you are expecting a bill that doesn’t come, contact your account holder immediately. If you see any unexpected spikes in your interest rates, contact your creditor. Unexpected interest rate spikes can be a tip off that erroneous information is contaminating your credit report. Watch for withdrawals or charges you did not make!

Contact Information