Articles Posted in Credit Report Errors

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When you have a judgment against you, and it’s on your credit report, it can be frustrating.

However, once you have a satisfaction of judgment, it can be a breath of fresh air as that judgment must show that it has been “paid” or “satisfied”.

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Here is an example of a recent federal court lawsuit we filed against Hyundai Capital (also known as Kia Capital) for false credit reporting in violation of the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act).

As you can imagine, Hyundai/Kia deny any wrongdoing.

You can read the lawsuit below — our basic position is that Hyundai negligently or intentionally reported a false balance owed when it knew that our client did not owe any money.

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I read an interesting article that I agreed with in many respects by John Matarese of Channel 5 News in Florida. My one point of disagreement is that there is another solution — read below.

First, here are some interesting quotes from this excellent article:

“You will hear that’s easy to do, to simply write a dispute letter,” an exasperated Gayle Collier said.

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Certegy is a company we have dealt with before — we have not been impressed with their business practices. They just agreed to a massive fine — 3.5 million dollars for violating the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

Certegy Check Services, Inc., one of the nation’s largest check authorization service companies, has agreed to pay $3.5 million to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

Certegy, based in St. Petersburg, Florida, is a consumer reporting agency (CRA) that compiles consumers’ personal information and uses it to help retail merchants throughout the United States determine whether to accept consumers’ checks. Under the FCRA, consumers whose checks are denied based on information Certegy provides the merchant, have the right to dispute that information and have Certegy correct any inaccuracies.

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Representative Sam Johnson has an interesting bill that he says will decrease the likelihood of identity theft in an unusual area — identity thieves who are stealing the identities of people who have . . . died.

HR 2720, co-introduced by Johnson and Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-Calif.), is named after a deceased child victim of identity fraud and would delay the now-required publication of the SSA’s Death Master File.

If the bill passes, beginning January 2014, only death information released three years after the person has died would be made available – giving family members adequate time to file tax returns and preventing criminals from stealing the returns or information.

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Justin Baxter from Oregon obtained a remarkable verdict (18 million) for his client in a lawsuit against Equifax.

The jury was told she contacted Equifax eight times between 2009 and 2011 in an effort to correct inaccuracies, including erroneous accounts and collection attempts, as well as a wrong Social Security number and birthday. Her lawsuit alleged the Atlanta-based company failed to correct the mistakes.

While the verdict may be reduced as the punitive damage portion was many multiples of the compensatory portion the verdict should still be very significant and it sends a message that credit reports are important and juries do not like to see credit report errors that the credit bureaus refuse to fix.

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Nick LaFleur has a great article on the danger to college students from identity thieves that I recommend you read.

According to the FTC’s 2013 Consumer Sentinel Report, 21 percent of identity theft complaints in 2012 were filed by young adults- the most of any age group. What’s more, a 2010 survey by Javelin Strategy found that young adults aged 18-24 took the longest to detect identity theft-132 days on average-when compared to other age groups.

There are seven suggested steps to guard against this that Nick lists.

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